The Carbon Budget — Living Beyond Our Means

There are good reasons to calculate our carbon budget. The carbon pie shows how much CO2 we’ve got to play with, how much we’ve used and how fast we’re using it. This isn’t a license to pollute, but a warning about how much we have already polluted. As long as we didn’t precisely know how much carbon we could emit, it was easier for those with responsibility to run away from it or push it ahead of them. The carbon pie should be a visceral reminder of how urgent the problem has become and it should compel governments to reflect on what they all need to do to avoid overshooting. The small remaining carbon space no longer allows anyone to continue with business-as-usual.

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Commerce Court

Commerce Court

The most glorious ceiling in all of Toronto is — where else? — in a bank. Commerce Court was built in 1931 as the HQ for the Canadian Bank of Commerce, now CIBC.

The Canada 150 tulip

The Canada 150 tulip

For Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017, the government commissioned a new tulip. The red is meant to look like a maple leaf, and you can kinda see it.

Tipping points in the Arctic

When the summer melting season ended in 2007, the icecap floating in the ocean over the North Pole had shrunk to its smallest size ever recorded. According to satellite data, the remaining summer sea ice measured almost forty per cent less than the average for the period of 1979 to 2000. More than one-and-a-half million square kilometres that had been covered with ice the year before was open ocean. The event was a serious confirmation that had been suspected for a while in the scientific community: that the Earth may be prone to abrupt climate change and tipping points. The new science of non-linear change is challenging our notions of what climate change is and when it will occur—and it is utterly alarming.

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A blur of colours

A blur of colours

Are you dizzy yet? Effect achieved by zooming in from 18mm to approx 100mm and pressing the shutter simultaneously. The shutter speed was 1/50s, at f/3.5 ISO 100.